White people are not heroes, or confusing charity and social justice

I am commenting on Klassen: Don’t blame ‘colonialism’ for aboriginal tragedies from the Calgary Herald‘s July 29, 2013 edition.

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So? as we say in French, does one swallow make spring? Maybe her story is true. But anecdote is not history.

I will make a comparison. In the newspapers in Québec, there are always smartasses who write about their lazy brother-in-law who is on welfare, blablabla. They expect us to deduce from that all poor people are the same? But one case, one anecdote does not make history. Faulty reasoning and a huge oversimplification. And I will add it is outright public opinion manipulation.

There is huge prejudice in this article because the author assumes that if the FN persons live in poverty, it’s because they are lazy and they want to. And she paints the white person as a hero « saving » the child. But one individual case does not right the injustice to the rest of the group. Same problem about Depp buying Wounded Knee: white meddling that does not fix the root of the problem.

Did she ever wonder why these people were living in a trailer?

Adoption is a two-edged sword. You may give material wealth to the child, but you are uprooting him/her. Even in white-on white adoptions or foster families, this alone creates problems. Moreso when it is cross-cultural.

Also, charity is not social justice. What her parents did is charity, out of pity. What about the other kids? What about the stolen lands? And so on and so forth.

In short, this settler sees clearly the BS in the story. I don’t buy it one bit. And I will say so if I am allowed to comment on there. I have not found how yet.

Maybe Ms. Holier-Than-Thou should read this:  Aboriginal nutritional experiments had Ottawa’s approval.

And this: Using the right word — genocide — to describe Canada’s treatment of Aboriginal peoples

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